Book in a Minute – Library Edition: Born a Crime

This book is getting so much buzz, it hardly needs my little review. But here it is anyway. A confession not included in my review at the library’s website: I was really pissed at Noah for becoming the next host of The Daily Show, since I (like many women) fully expected it to be Samantha Bee. But he has grown on me over time–and Samantha’s doing okay for herself too, so all’s forgiven. But more than that, this book has really transformed my opinion of him. Not because of the hardships he faced (although there were plenty) – more because of the grace and humor with which he has approached those hardships, and the gift he seems to have for relating his personal experiences to the wider world and its struggles with racism, sexism, and all the other  “-isms” that plague our age.

 

Born a CrimeBorn a Crime by Trevor Noah
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Trevor Noah leapt to prominence in the U.S. when he succeeded Jon Stewart as host of The Daily Show. Now, at age 32, he’s published his memoir. If that seems premature, it’s only because you haven’t read it yet. The title of Noah’s book, Born a Crime, is an indictment of the apartheid system into which the South African comedian was born.

More than an autobiography, Born a Crime is a child’s eyewitness account of life under apartheid and the upheaval that followed when that regime ended. The book’s also a tribute to Noah’s feisty, outspoken mother, Patricia. A member of the Xhosa tribe, Patricia defied the law by having a relationship with white businessman Robert Noah. Once Trevor was born, the couple couldn’t be seen in public as his parents. They enlisted a mixed race neighbor to pose with Robert and Trevor for “family” photos. The Black woman standing in the background of those photos, pretending to be the nanny, was Trevor’s real mother.

Noah finds humor and pathos in this bizarre upbringing. On a more serious note, he also speaks out strongly against domestic violence. Many years after her relationship with Noah’s father, Patricia married Ngisaveni Shingange. Noah recounts in chilling detail the gradual escalation of violence in the household and his mother’s struggle to leave Shingange. The decision almost led to her death. His stepfather’s threats against Trevor’s own life were one of the reasons the comedian turned his sights to a career in America.

Clearly, Noah has packed a lot of living into his short life — and this book only covers the first 25 years. Fans of books by The Daily Show alumni Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart will enjoy reading Noah’s autobiography, but it will also be of interest to anyone curious about life under apartheid.

Reviewed published at “Between the Covers,” the Baltimore County Public Library’s book review blog [http://www.bcpl.info/between-the-cove…] on December 20, 2016.

View all my reviews

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